AACRAO Asian and Pacific Islander Caucus

Asian Pacific Islander Caucus

  • Meet the Members

     

     

    Michelle Tsigaridas Weller, Associate Registrar and Director of Academic Operations, New York Law School

    Michelle Weller CC
    I exist at the intersection of identities that includes Filipina, Greek, US American, young-professional, cis-woman, working-mother, ally.

     

    I acknowledge institutional barriers to success and realize that change can only occur when underrepresented voices are heard, amplified and consulted at the heart of any strategic planning. My experiences have helped me to engage with students, faculty and staff with empathy, and to advocate for them personally and procedurally. 



    Keiko Broomhead, Ed.D., Vice President of Enrollment Management, Wentworth Institute of Technology 

    Keiko Broomhead CC
    I am forever grateful and honor my parents who immigrated to this country.  They taught me the critical importance of kindness and compassion and the value of education. I have been fortunate to have had the support and help of family, friends, colleagues, and mentors and am committed to help and support others as they pursue education and career opportunities.

     



    Quentin Law Phu, Assistant Director for International Admission, Ithaca College

    Quentin Law Phu CCGrowing up as a second-generation Asian immigrant, a college education provided a way out of poverty and gave me the confidence needed to change my life. Throughout the years, I was fortunate to have mentors who helped shaped me personally, academically, and professionally.

     

    I am forever grateful and as a way to give back, I strive to continue to make a positive difference in the lives of the students that I encounter in my everyday work. I am committed to providing them with the same supportive mentoring relationships that my mentors provided me.



    Tricia Ryan, Director of Graduate Admissions & Program Evaluations, San José State University

    Tricia Ryan CCServing for over 15 years, I’ve come to understand more and more how much I deeply honor the bold moves and contributions of every participant in higher education. Whether student, staff, faculty, or administrator I thrive by being part of a movement of people that continually prepares and creates the next best thing for our incredible world.

    Hannah Arendt (1954) states, 'Education is the point at which we decide whether we love the world enough to assume responsibility for it.' I believe it is a disposition toward greatness that gladly assumes responsibility for our future through education.

    As an immigrant to this country, I live an enriched experience of leadership greatly informed by my Filipino heritage and values of harmony, unity, joy, and ambition. And this has been critical in joining others to effectively lead in my current institution.

     


    Rajeev Jayadeva, Assistant Director - Office of the Registrar, Nassau Community College SUNY

    Rajeev Jayadeva CC
    Barack Obama said ‘Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for. We are the change that we seek’, and that is why I am in education so we may be the change that our students can see and aspire to become, as well as assist in the professional development of our colleagues so they may grow and serve our students.  

     

    I have been in academia almost all of my professional career, including as a member of the Faculty, and now as a Higher Education Administrator. Our goal as Educators and Leaders must be to enrich the lives of others through education, and through hard work be an example to our students who aspire to be something greater in a multi-cultural world that is continuously changing with new challenges. 



    Adam Burgess, Associate Registrar & Yoga Instructor, University of West Florida

    Adam Burgess CCA vital university experience of mine was further exposure to diversity, and it was at our alma mater where I met my partner.

     

    My wife has a few identities: she is "nisei" because her mother immigrated to the US from Okinawa, she is "hapa" because she is half Okinawan and half Irish American, and she is a working mother. By being open to diverse identities we, as leaders, can cultivate compassionate change that will impact those we serve. 

     

     

     

     

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