International Students Increasingly Ask: Is It Safe to Study in the U.S.?

International Students Increasingly Ask: Is It Safe to Study in the U.S.?

May 05, 2013

The death of a Chinese graduate student, Lingzi Lu, in the Boston Marathon bombings has led families in China to question whether they should feel secure in sending their children to be educated in the United States. Although most experts say the bombings will affect neither international students presently studying in the U.S., nor the country™s future foreign enrollments, many international students are increasingly aware of safety issues when deciding whether to study abroad. Contributing to foreigners' perceptions of the U.S. are news reports; popular American television shows like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, widely available in China and Japan; and the crime figures reported, as required by law, by U.S. colleges. Schools also have rapid alert systems to notify students and staff of potentially dangerous situations. Other countries do not have such reporting requirements or emergency notification systems.

Although it is unlikely Chinese students would turn down the chance to study in the U.S., they may take other precautions, such as avoiding large crowds, such as at rallies or sporting events. Others might choose to go to college in areas they perceive as safer. Colleges are also thinking about how to tackle questions of safety, such as highlighting a safe campus in admissions materials or giving students practical safety tips.

International Students Increasingly Ask: Is It Safe to Study in the U.S.?
Karin Fischer
The Chronicle of Higher Education
April 23, 2013

Study Abroad Safety