Obama and the Biracial Factor: What's Critical about ‘Critical Mass?’ Exploring Diversity and Social Justice in Higher Education

When: Presenter Registration Cost:

June 26, 2013
2:00 - 3:00 pm ET

Archive Available

Andrew Jolivette,
​Associate Professor and Department Chair in
American Indian Studies
San Francisco State University

No Charge

OVERVIEW:

Over the past 25 years there have been major changes in the population demographics of the United States. These shifting demographics are perhaps best exemplified by the election and subsequent re-election of President Barack Obama, the nation's first biracial, African-American President. As the U.S. electorate has changed, so too are the college student demographics titling toward a new American majority. This presentation explores the critical intersections of multiracial identity, socio-economics, race, gender, and immigration. The webinar presentation also asks participants to consider how we meet the needs of our changing student demographics not just by providing more access, but by changing the institutional culture of our institutions.

Presenter:

Andrew Jolivette,
Associate Professor and Department Chair in American Indian Studies, San Francisco State University

Andrew Jolivette, Ph.D., is an accomplished educator, writer, speaker, and social/cultural critic. His work spans many different social and political arenas “ from education reform, to community of color issues, critical mixed-race movement building, LGBT/Queer community of color identity issues, gay marriage, and AIDS disparities within indigenous and people of color communities.

Dr. Jolivette is an Associate Professor and Department Chair in American Indian Studies at San Francisco State University, where he is an affiliated faculty member in Educational Leadership and Race and Resistance Studies. Jolivette is an IHART (Indigenous HIV/AIDS Research Training) Fellow at the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute at the University of Washington in Seattle. In 2005 he completed a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship through the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Jolivette is a mixed-race studies specialist with a particular interest in comparative race relations, the urban Indian experience, people of color and popular culture, critical mixed race studies and social justice, Creole studies, Black-Indians, and mixed-race health disparities. He has been an adjunct professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of San Francisco and a researcher with the University of California, San Francisco on issues of racial violence among African American and Latino/a youth in the Bay Area.

He sits on the advisory committee for the 2 Spirit Grant Project at the Native American Health Center, is the board president of Speak Out “ the Institute for Democratic Education and Culture, the Board Co-Chair of the GLBT Historical Society in San Francisco, and the former board president of iPride.

Jolivette is the author of three books, Obama and the Biracial Factor: The Battle for a New American Majority (2012), Cultural Representation in Native America (2006), and Louisiana Creoles: Cultural Recovery and Mixed Race Native American Identity (2007). He is currently at work on a new book, Indian Blood: Mixed Race Gay Men, Transgender Women, and HIV.

Moderator:


Adrienne McDay
AACRAO President; Coordinator of Registration “ William Rainey Harper College

Additional information:

AACRAO offers professional development opportunities through meetings and online courses. For more information, please visit our Future Meetings page, or find out more about online courses at our Online Courses page.

Obama and the Biracial Factor - the Battle for a New American Majority available for purchase at: http://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/distributed/O/bo13320228.html

Registration Cost: No Registration Fee

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For questions about the webinar please contact AACRAO at webinar@aacrao.org or call 202-293-9161.